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Psychological aspects of working with an IDE
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Posted By:   george_henry
Posted On:   Friday, March 29, 2002 07:21 PM

I am a nearly-brilliant programmer who started his career back in the pre-GUI days. I always felt comfortable and powerful sitting in front of a command-line prompt, knowing how to issue a command that would make the computer do what I wanted. If I needed to supply more information than a simple command and argument, I would type it in. I didn't have to constantly think about all the defaults, and the alternatives that had nothing to do with my needs and concerns. I downloaded the free trial version of JBuilder today and started trying to figure it out. I realized, IDEs are very intimidating to me. (I had the same problem with Visual Basic, but eventually learned the IDE and got used to it.) I can't click on anything withou   More>>

I am a nearly-brilliant programmer who started his career back in the pre-GUI days. I always felt comfortable and powerful sitting in front of a command-line prompt, knowing how to issue a command that would make the computer do what I wanted. If I needed to supply more information than a simple command and argument, I would type it in. I didn't have to constantly think about all the defaults, and the alternatives that had nothing to do with my needs and concerns.

I downloaded the free trial version of JBuilder today and started trying to figure it out. I realized, IDEs are very intimidating to me. (I had the same problem with Visual Basic, but eventually learned the IDE and got used to it.)

I can't click on anything without having multiple options and default settings, folders and filenames fairly spewed in my face - most of which I realize (and I reassure my brain of this to stop it from screaming) is irrelevant to the task at hand.

Does anyone else tend to have this kind of psychological reaction to IDEs? If so, how do you handle it, control it, get past it? I really want to learn Java. I am not sure that facing the learning curve of the language and the intimidation of the IDE simultaneously is the best way.

Best regards,

George

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Re: Psychological aspects of working with an IDE

Posted By:   Luigi_Viggiano  
Posted On:   Saturday, March 30, 2002 10:51 AM

There are so much options as so may setting you could have for the specific tool. Generally you can leave them as they are if you don't understand them,and use it only when needed. You can also use JBuilder as a simple editor and run/compile your classes handly, but what is then the advantage of using an IDE? You may keep patience and don't loose your heart when facing so many options: you may think that early you'll know them all and you'll be able to use them at best. I can understand you, but knowing Java in the deep will help you to understand all those options, and even switching to another IDE you'll find the same things and tools organized in a different way, but you'll be aware of what they mean.

Re: Psychological aspects of working with an IDE

Posted By:   Geoff_Lane  
Posted On:   Saturday, March 30, 2002 10:36 AM

Use vi or emacs (or whatever your preference is) to program in Java then. I'm a Unix guy who really likes the simple tools that work together maxim myself and so am not enitrely sold on IDEs either.



IDEs are nice in some ways though, but they are heavy weight. I always sort of have the same feel of 'where do I start' when I use many IDEs.



What I came to find out though is that some of the features such as code completion and class browsers make it worth it. Generally the first thing I learn how to do in an IDE is to learn to turn features off. :) Seriously, I think it helps a lot to pare that stuff down.



I'd also reccommend Net Beans to you. It's free, Open Source and pretty darn good. It's also very configurable which goes back to the turn things off comment.
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