How to receive "multipart/signed" message from Exchange Server
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Posted By:   Paul_Tai
Posted On:   Tuesday, May 1, 2001 08:54 AM

When receiving incoming mail, my application checks to see if the content type is multipart/signed and if so it will authenticate the signature. This works with the Netscape Messaging Server but not with Exchange Server. With Netscape Messaging Server, when I print out all the header lines (MimeMessage.getAllHeaderLines()), the message content type is multipart/signed. Then it is text/plain for the first bodypart and application/x-pkcs7-signature for the second. With Exchange Server, however, the message content type is either text/plain if POP3 is used or multipart/alternative with text/plain for the first body part and text/html for the second if IMAP is used but the signature part is missing. Can anyone help?    More>>

When receiving incoming mail, my application checks to see if the content type is multipart/signed and if so it will authenticate the signature. This works with the Netscape Messaging Server but not with Exchange Server.

With Netscape Messaging Server, when I print out all the header lines (MimeMessage.getAllHeaderLines()), the message content type is multipart/signed. Then it is text/plain for the first bodypart and application/x-pkcs7-signature for the second.

With Exchange Server, however, the message content type is either text/plain if POP3 is used or multipart/alternative with text/plain for the first body part and text/html for the second if IMAP is used but the signature part is missing.

Can anyone help?

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Re: How to receive &quot;multipart/signed&quot; message from Exchange Server

Posted By:   Paul_Tai  
Posted On:   Tuesday, May 1, 2001 01:25 PM

I just found out from Microsoft knowledgebase that if the Exchange Server is not set up to allow S/MIME signatures, it will modify the message and deliver to the client without the signature. I really don't understand this option. If a message has been digitally signed, it should be delivered to the client as such. If the client can handle it, fine. If it cannot, the user will know it is digital signed and try other ways to read it. If it is delivered as unsigned, the user will just treat it as a regular email.
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