What about Java
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Posted By:   Aladdin_Mouhaimeed
Posted On:   Tuesday, April 8, 2003 07:31 AM

In my faculty they
are talking about java is going to be history, and the future is for vb.net and
for C#.

Well my friends, do you think so?

Please help me to prove this claim is false by sending me your objective
opinions?.

Re: What about Java

Posted By:   Aladdin_Mouhaimeed  
Posted On:   Tuesday, April 8, 2003 10:36 AM

I think I got very god answers up until now, thank you everybody.


I hope I have more good answers from the people visiting this forum.

Re: What about Java

Posted By:   David_Bates  
Posted On:   Tuesday, April 8, 2003 08:19 AM

Doing a Google search will find you websites devoted to this argument. I'm mainly a Java programmer, but I've read a few books on C# and liked it a lot, mainly because once you've done Java (and C++), it's really not that hard to learn.



In my mind, there are a few points to consider:

  • Java has been around now for a long time. It is well established as a teaching tool at University. There are lots of freely-available libraries for it and teething difficulties have been delt with. .NET has all this to come....

  • Java has the support of many large companies, not least IBM. I can hardly see IBM throwing Java away to go with .NET. As long as there are still big players like IBM using Java, it isn't going anywhere...

  • Java and many excellent tools, IDEs, products freely available. I know you can use the .NET compilers without Visual Studio, but I have yet to see a really good, free IDE for C# etc.

  • Java is platform-independant. You can get a Java program to run on pretty much any operating system/machine.


It'd be interesting to ask you friends what they think C# has got that Java doesn't. There really isn't anything that Java doesn't cover.



However, I do have to point out that it is my personal belief that the two can co-exist happily, especially now that inter-connectivity and XML are becoming more important.

Re: What about Java

Posted By:   David_Bates  
Posted On:   Tuesday, April 8, 2003 08:19 AM

Doing a Google search will find you websites devoted to this argument. I'm mainly a Java programmer, but I've read a few books on C# and liked it a lot, mainly because once you've done Java (and C++), it's really not that hard to learn.



In my mind, there are a few points to consider:

  • Java has been around now for a long time. It is well established as a teaching tool at University. There are lots of freely-available libraries for it and teething difficulties have been delt with. .NET has all this to come....

  • Java has the support of many large companies, not least IBM. I can hardly see IBM throwing Java away to go with .NET. As long as there are still big players like IBM using Java, it isn't going anywhere...

  • Java and many excellent tools, IDEs, products freely available. I know you can use the .NET compilers without Visual Studio, but I have yet to see a really good, free IDE for C# etc.

  • Java is platform-independant. You can get a Java program to run on pretty much any operating system/machine.


It'd be interesting to ask you friends what they think C# has got that Java doesn't. There really isn't anything that Java doesn't cover.



However, I do have to point out that it is my personal belief that the two can co-exist happily, especially now that inter-connectivity and XML are becoming more important.

Re: What about Java

Posted By:   Brian_Glodde  
Posted On:   Tuesday, April 8, 2003 08:12 AM

Your friends are simply incorrect, IMHO. Java is very prevalent language and many companies have significant investment in Java technologies throughout their enterprises. Do you really believe companies like BEA, Sun and IBM are fearing VB.net and C#? Highly doubtful.


I believe the whole separation of the runtime from the language is really similar to the model of Java, although this also is not new. M$oft and Sun couldn't make the relationship work, so I believe they saw the value in Java (otherwise why all the litigation) and modelled theirs after it. Ever look at C# code or the enraging J# code? Looks way too similar.


Personally, I look at a language agnostically as a tool, not unlike a wrench. Sometimes one wrench fits better than another, therefore it is used. Lots of IT people are hung up on saying "this is better than this". Very closed minded view.


This thread should yield some interesting viewpoints.

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