Sending non standard keyboard characters over a socket
1 posts in topic
Flat View  Flat View
TOPIC ACTIONS:
 

Posted By:   Andy_None
Posted On:   Monday, March 31, 2003 01:07 PM

I am trying to send non standard keyboard characters over a socket. I know the characters i want to send, and I THINK their ASCII hex representation (e.g. 99 corresponds to the trademark symbol according to ultra edit). I read that the first 255 character of unicode are the same as ASCII but this does not seem to be true as u0099 results in a question mark being sent over the socket not the TM symbol. What is the easiest way to send non standard characters? is it possible to send them from their raw hex(?) data. This is a sample of the kind of things im trying to send (I cannot seem to copy and paste them into a Java String which is why Im asking this question): ÖwÿW( ÿñ Ž þ È ^™‘ Thanks    More>>

I am trying to send non standard keyboard characters over a socket. I know the characters i want to send, and I THINK their ASCII hex representation (e.g. 99 corresponds to the trademark symbol according to ultra edit). I read that the first 255 character of unicode are the same as ASCII but this does not seem to be true as u0099 results in a question mark being sent over the socket not the TM symbol.

What is the easiest way to send non standard characters? is it possible to send them from their raw hex(?) data.

This is a sample of the kind of things im trying to send (I cannot seem to copy and paste them into a Java String which is why Im asking this question):

ÖwÿW( ÿñ Ž þ È ^™‘

Thanks

   <<Less

Re: Sending non standard keyboard characters over a socket

Posted By:   Christopher_Koenigsberg  
Posted On:   Monday, March 31, 2003 02:43 PM

In your string, when I view this page in IE6 on W2K, the final character appears to me as a "tm" symbol, and I see in the source that it you entered it as #145.


By the way when you say "ASCII", strictly speaking I think that only includes the original, 7-bit US-ASCII character set (only 128 characters).



If you want 8-bit character sets, you have to decide which one you want; perhaps you are thinking of "iso-8859-1"? The man page for "iso-8859-1" in Linux does say that it "may already be seen as the de-facto standard ASCII replacement", also that the ISO 8859-1 characters are the first 256 characters of ISO 10646 (Unicode).

About | Sitemap | Contact